Spark Foundry takes home Bing’s 2017 Agency of the Year & Innovator of the Year awards

Hosted by the Daily Show’s Trevor Noah, Bing’s 2017 Agency Awards event celebrated “the practice of search” by recognizing key executives and agencies. The post Spark Foundry takes home Bing’s 2017 Agency of the Year & Innovator of the Year awards appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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Our Top 11 Content Marketing Takeaways from #CMWorld 2017

Last week, thousands of marketers from all over the world descended on the Rock N’ Roll capital of the world, Cleveland, OH, for the seventh annual Content Marketing World Conference and Expo.

Featuring more than 130 speakers, keynotes and panelists, dozens of different tracks, and a whole lot of orange, the four-day event was exciting and inspiring. And the TopRank Marketing team was out in full-force, providing live coverage, learning from some of the best in the business, dancing to 80s classics and making new connections.

While it’s nearly impossible to distill all the inspiring insights we collected during the event into this one post, we’re going to try. Below we share a handful of insights that really resonated with our team.

#1 – Shoot for resonance — not reach.

Content marketing was born out of the need to satisfy our audience’s thirst for knowledge and to satisfy their questions. But with so much content out there these days — it’s more important than ever to ensure your strategy is hyperfocused on who you audience is, what they need from you, and what will truly resonate — not just reach — your audience.

During his keynote address on opening day, Jay Acunzo, creator and host of Unthinkable.fm, encouraged the room to start thinking ourselves — not just rely on industry best practices — and have a renewed focus on creating content that makes meaningful connections with our audience.

“When we pay more attention to the customer than to the industry, then the customer will pay more attention to us,” Acunzo stated. “[We need to] stop focusing on reach and start focusing on resonance.”


Stop focusing on reach & start focusing on resonance. – @jayacunzo #CMWorld
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#2 – All you need is less.

It’s certainly no secret that we’re living in a world of content abundance. But if we want to create content that really resonates and makes our audience feel something, we need to remember that less is more, according to prolific writer, marketer and speaker Ann Handley.

Using the classic E.B. White novel, Charlotte’s Web, Handley declared the title character the best content marketer in the world. Using just four phrases — Some pig, terrific, radiant and humble — Charlotte was not only able to save little Wilbur’s life, but also make Farmer Zuckerman believe and feel he had something special.

“Think of how Charlotte was able to save a life with just [a few] words,” Handley challenged her audience. “How can we use our words more intentionally? How can we make a difference?”

The bottom line? You don’t need more content. You need better content. Content that helps your audience see, feel, taste, hear and touch the story you’re telling.


How can we use our words more intentionally to make a difference with our content? @annhandley #CMWorld
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#3 – Stories are all around you — and mostly right under your nose.

Marketers often feel they don’t have the time, budget or resources to effectively create compelling, story-driven content. But, according to GE’s Chief Marketing Officer Linda Boff, inspiration is closer than you may think.

As Boff imparted her experience and knowledge onto the crowd during her keynote address, one of her most compelling slides simply said: “Stories are right under your nose — we just might need to change the lense every now and then.”

So, leverage the people, resources and data that you do have to iterate on how you tell your story and come up with new ideas.


Stories are right under your nose. – @lindaboff #CMWorld
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#4 – Give everyone a seat at the content marketing table.

Quality content is the foundation of every marketing strategy. And while you may think the success of your content marketing initiatives rests in the capable and creative hands of your marketing team members, you may be missing out on a big internal opportunity.

According to Jillian Hillard, the Director of Brand and Product Marketing for Electrolux Home Care and SDA, North America, getting the content marketing buy-in of key players from multiple departments can give your strategy wings.

“Everyone needs to have a seat at the table in the beginning,” Hillard said. “This creates community of openness, trust, camaraderie, support and gets everyone excited about the new journey.”

Some of the departments — or characters as Hillard said — that need your consideration could be: product development, sales, finance and customer service.

“Once your organization [as a whole] sees the value, then content marketing becomes contagious,” she said.


Once your org sees the value, then #contentmarketing becomes contagious. – @JillianHillard
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#5 – Design video content to hold attention.

Video content marketing has gone from the next big thing to the current big thing. Brands that pump out a ton of text-based content are now flooding the attention marketplace with video. And just as we had to learn how to make content work for marketing, we’re all still figuring out how to make effective marketing video. That’s where the incomparable Andrew Davis, an author and in-demand speaker, provided some insight.

While we like to think our audience will click play and hang on to the end where our CTA lives, we know they bail early. So, our goal needs to be to occupy their interest and their desire to know over time. And to put it simply, it’s not lack of attention span that causes our audience to bail or become disinterested. It’s the lack of content designed to hold attention.


We earn attention by satiating the audience's desire to know over time. @DrewDavisHere #CMWorld
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#6 – Influencer marketing success is built on relationships.

Influencer marketing is booming — and it’s not hard to see why. Influencers add insight, credibility and authority to content, as well as help spread your message to new and larger audiences.

But as TopRank Marketing’s own CEO, Lee Odden, said during his presentation on enterprise influencer marketing: “There are a lot of cowboys out there. … A lot of people are just shooting from the hip when it comes to influencer marketing.”

As a result, if you want to create a dynamic influencer program, your strategy needs to have the perfect balances of great content and strong influencer relationships.

“The stronger your relation and community, the stronger the amplification of the content will be,” he said.


Stronger #influencer relationships = stronger the #content amplification. – @leeodden #CMWorld
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#7 – Content should focus on the why — not the what.

During her session, Lisa Mattson, Director of Marketing & Communications for Jordan Vineyard & Winery, shared how their video-centric strategy is winning over their audience. But one insight bomb that she dropped goes beyond video:

Simply put, it all comes down to storytelling. You need a compelling narrative that’s hyper-focused on why your organization does what it does if you want to connect with and engage your audience.


People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it. – @lisamattsonwine #CMWorld
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#8 – Prioritize work to guard against burn-out.

As Workfront’s Heather Hurst and Nordstrom’s Erica Gunn put it: It’s time to stop killing your content team. Your copywriters likely have a full plate and asking them to do more with less won’t work for long. So, if you want to keep your team happy and productive, you need to find a balance between what’s urgent and what’s important.

A project management system like Workfront can absolutely help ease this burden, but it’s also essential to make time for unplanned work. Hurst and Gunn suggested planning for approximately 60% of your team’s tasks so you have 40% wiggle room.


Budget time for unplanned work. – @heatherbhurst & Erica Gunn #CMWorld
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#9 – Stop telling your audience how amazing you are.

As comedian and marketer Tim Washer told the room during his session, when we use amazing words over and over again, they have the amazing ability to lose their amazing meaning. So, if you want to create video that is full of joy for your viewer, you need to stop telling people your company is amazing. Rather, you should start telling them stories and let them reach their own conclusion.


Stop telling people your company is amazing. Tell them stories & let them reach their own…
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#10 – Make culture your ‘North Star.’

According to adidas’ Frank Thomas, the digital world is so complex and volatile that our go-to tools for audience identification are no longer sufficient. Personas, scenarios, observed past behavior — they all change as fast as we can construct them.

So, instead of trying to become what an ever-changing audience wants, why not make culture your north star? According to Thomas, if you’re able to define what your brand stands for and you can become a beacon to your most valuable audience.


Instead of trying to become what your audience wants, make culture your North Star. – @framatho #CMWorld
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#11 – Data-driven content isn’t about the facts and figures.

Data. Data. Data. It’s safe to say all marketers agree that data provides the necessary insight to help us optimize content performance, personalize content and prove business value. But the thing is: data in a vacuum isn’t insightful or helpful. In the end, it’s not about the facts and figures themselves; it’s about how we shape that data into compelling stories.

According to Analytics Advocate at Google, Adam Singer, that’s where data visualization can come in pretty handy. Singer recommended “storyboarding” your visualizations before you even pull the data in. Nail down who you’re talking to, what questions you’re answering, and the story you’re telling before you create a single chart.


Storyboard your visualizations before pulling in data. – @AdamSinger #CMWorld #datavisualization
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Share Your Top #CMWorld Takeaways

If you were one of the thousands of content marketers in attendance, we invite you to share some of your favorite moments, insights and takeaways, too. Share them with us in the comments section below.


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© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2017. | Our Top 11 Content Marketing Takeaways from #CMWorld 2017 | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post Our Top 11 Content Marketing Takeaways from #CMWorld 2017 appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


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Announcing the shortlist of 2017 Search Engine Land Awards nominees

For the third consecutive year, the selection process in the Search Engine Land Awards became even more difficult, as the field of competition grew to nearly 300 worthy submissions from leading digital agencies, in-house marketing teams and individuals around the world.   Michelle Robbins, the…

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Creator Monetization Report 2017: How Bloggers, Video Creators, and Podcasters Make Money

Are you a blogger, video creator, or podcaster? Are you wondering how creators are making money? Look no further. In the first study of its kind, Social Media Examiner commissioned a comprehensive study of more than 4,300 creators. In this report, you’ll discover: The most common ways creators monetize their work. What produces the most […]

This post Creator Monetization Report 2017: How Bloggers, Video Creators, and Podcasters Make Money first appeared on .
– Your Guide to the Social Media Jungle

August 22, 2017: The day the ‘Hawk’ Google local algorithm update swooped in

Have you noticed a recent shift in Google’s local search results? Columnist Joy Hawkins shares everything you need to know about the ‘Hawk’ update, which seems to have killed some of the changes we saw with Possum. The post August 22, 2017: The day the ‘Hawk’ Google local algorithm…

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The E-Commerce Benchmark KPI Study 2017: 15 Essential Takeaways

Posted by Alan_Coleman

Is your website beating, meeting, or behind the industry average?

Wolfgang Digital’s 2017 E-Commerce Benchmark KPI Study is out with an even bigger sample size than ever before. Analyzing 143 million website sessions and $ 531 million in online revenues, the study gives e-commerce marketers essential insights to help benchmark their business’s online performance and understand which metrics drive e-commerce success.

This study is our gift to the global e-commerce industry. The objective is to reveal the state of play in the industry over the last 12 months and ultimately help digital marketers make better digital marketing decisions by:

  1. Better understanding their website performance through comparing key performance indicators (KPIs) with industry benchmarks.
  2. Gaining insights into which key metrics will ensure e-commerce success

You can digest the full study here.

Skim through the key takeaways below:


1. Google remains people’s window to the web, but its dominance is in decline.

The search giant generates 62% of all traffic and 63% of all revenue. This is down from 69% of traffic and 67% of revenue in last year’s study. In numerical terms, Google is growing — it’s simply that the big G’s share of the pie is in decline.

2. Google’s influence is declining as consumers’ paths to purchase become more diverse, with “dark traffic” on the rise.

This occurs when Google Analytics doesn’t recognize a source by default, like people sharing links on WhatsApp. Dark traffic shows up as direct traffic in Google Analytics. Direct traffic grew from 17% to 18% of traffic.

3. Consumers’ paths to purchase have gotten longer.

It now takes 12% more clicks to generate a million euro online than it did 12 months ago, with 360,000 clicks being the magic million-euro number in 2017.

4. Mobile earns more share, yet desktop still delivers the dollars.

2017 is the first year mobile claimed more sessions (52%) than desktop (36%) and tablet (12%) combined. Desktop generates 61% of all online revenue, with users 164% more likely to convert than those browsing on mobile. Plus, when desktop users convert, they spend an average of 20% more per order than mobile shoppers.

5. The almighty conversion rate: e-commerce sites average 1.6%.

E-commerce websites averaged 1.6% overall. Travel came in at 2.4%. Online-only retailers saw 1.8% conversion rates, while their multichannel counterparts averaged 1.2%

6. Don’t shop if you’re hungry.

Conversion rates for food ordering sites are fifteen times those of typical retail e-commerce!

***Correlation explanation: The most unique and most useful part of our study is our correlation calculation. We analyze which website metrics correlate with e-commerce success. Before I jump into our correlation findings, let me explain how to read them. Zero means no correlation between the two metrics. One means perfect correlation; for example, “every time I sneeze, I close my eyes.” Point five (0.5) means that as one metric increases 100%, the other metric increases 50%. A negative correlation means that as one variable increases, the other decreases.

From our experience compiling these stats over the years, any correlation over .2 is worth noting. North of 0.4 is a very strong correlation. I’ve ranked the following correlations below in order of strength, starting with the strongest.

7. Sticky websites sell more (0.6).

The strongest correlation in the study was between time spent on a website and conversion rate (0.6 correlation). By increasing time on site by 16%, conversion rates ramp up 10%. Pages per session also correlated solidly with revenue growth (0.25).

8. People trust Google (0.48).

According to Forbes, Google is the world’s second most valuable brand. Our figures agree. People who got more than average organic traffic from Google enjoyed a savagely strong conversion rate (0.48). It seems that when Google gives prominent organic coverage to a website, that website enjoys higher trust and, in turn, higher conversion rates from consumers.

9. Tablet shoppers love a bit of luxury (0.4).

Higher-than-average tablet sessions correlated very strongly with high average order values (0.4). However, pricey purchases require more clicks, no matter the device.

10. Loyal online shoppers are invaluable (0.35).

Your best-converting customers are always your returning loyal customers. Typically they show up as direct traffic, high levels of which correlated very strongly with conversion rates (0.35).

11. Speed matters (0.25).

005Onsite Engagement.jpg

Average site speed was 6 seconds. This is far higher than the generally recommended 2 seconds. There was a strong inverse correlation between average page load time and revenue growth (0.25). Reducing the average load time by 1.6 seconds would increase annual revenue growth by 10%.

12. Mobile is a money-making machine (0.25).

009Revenue Growth.jpg

Websites that got more mobile pageviews (0.25) and more tablet pageviews (0.24) grew revenue faster.

13. Email pays dividends (0.24).

002Source-Rev.jpg

Email delivers three times as much revenue as Facebook on a last-click basis. Those who get more traffic from email also enjoy a higher AOV (0.24).

14. Bing CPC represents a quick win (0.22).

Websites with a higher share of Bing CPC traffic tend to see a higher AOV (0.22). This, coupled with lower CPCs, makes Bing an attractive low-volume high-profit proposition. Bing has made the route into Bing Ads much easier, introducing a simple one-click tool which will convert your AdWords campaigns into Bing Ad campaigns.

15. Pinterest can be powerful (0.22).

Websites with more Pinterest traffic enjoyed higher AOVs (0.22). This demonstrates Pinterest’s power as a visual research engine, a place where people research ideas before taking an action — for example, planning a wedding, designing a living room, or purchasing a pair of pumps. The good news for digital marketers is that Pinterest recently launched its self-service ad platform.


Black holes

We used Google Analytics to compile the report. Once installed correctly, Google Analytics is very accurate in the numbers it does reports. However, there are two areas it struggles to report on that digital marketers need to keep in mind:

  1. Offline conversions: For 99% of our data set, there is no offline conversion tracking setup. Google is introducing measures to make it easier to track this. Once marketing directors get visibility on the offline impact of their online spend, we expect more offline budget to migrate online.
  2. Cross-device conversions: It’s currently very difficult to measure cross device conversions. According to Google themselves, 90% of goals occur on more than one device. Yet Google Analytics favors the sturdy desktop, as it generates the most same-device conversions. The major loser here is social, with 9 out of 10 Facebook sessions being mobile sessions. Instagram and Snapchat don’t even have a desktop version of their app!

Google is preparing to launch enhanced reporting in the coming months, which will give greater visibility on cross-device conversions. Hopefully this will give us a clearer picture of social’s role in conversion for our 2018 study.

The full report is available here and I’d love to answer your questions in the comments section below.

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State of Enterprise SEO 2017: Overworked SEOs Need Direction

Posted by NorthStarInbound

This survey and its analysis was co-authored with North Star Inbound’s senior creative strategist, Andrea Pretorian.

In the spring of 2017, North Star Inbound partnered up with seoClarity and BuzzStream to survey the state of enterprise SEO. We had a fair share of anecdotal evidence from our clients, but we wanted a more objective measurement of how SEO teams are assembled, what resources are allocated to them, what methods they use, and how they perform.

We hadn’t seen such data collected, particularly for enterprise SEO. We found this surprising given its significance, evident even in the number of “enterprise SEO tools” and solutions being marketed.

What is enterprise SEO?

There is no single fixed-industry definition of “enterprise” beyond “large business.” For the purposes of this survey, we defined enterprise businesses as being comprised of 500 or more employees. “Small enterprise” means 500–1000 employees, while “large enterprise” means over 1000 employees.

Industry discussion often points to the number of pages as being a potential defining factor for enterprise SEO, but even that is not necessarily a reliable measure.

What was our survey methodology?

We developed the widest enterprise SEO survey to date, made up of 29 questions that delved into every aspect of the enterprise SEO practice. From tools and tactics to content development, keyword strategy, and more, we left no stone unturned. We then picked the brains of 240 SEO specialists across the country. You can check out our complete survey, methodology, and results here.

Team size matters — or does it?

Let’s start by looking at enterprise team size and the resources allocated to them. We focused on companies with an in-house SEO team, and broke them down in terms of small (500–1000 employees) and large enterprise (>1000 employees).

We found that 76% of small enterprise companies have in-house SEO teams of 5 people or less, but were surprised that 68% of large enterprise companies also had teams of this size. We expected a more pronounced shift into larger team sizes paralleling the larger size of their parent company; we did not expect to see roughly the same team size across small and large enterprise companies.

Chart_Q4_170522.png

Interestingly, in larger companies we also see less confidence in the team’s experience in SEO. Of the companies with in-house SEO, only 31.67% of large enterprise teams called themselves “leaders” in the SEO space, which was defined in this survey as part of a team engaged broadly and critically within the business. 40% of small enterprise teams called themselves “leaders.” In terms of viewing themselves more positively (leaders, visionaries) or less (SEO pioneers in their company or else new SEO teams), we did not notice a big difference between small or large enterprise in-house SEO teams.

Large enterprise companies should have more resources at their disposal — HR teams to hire the best talent, reliable onboarding practices in place, access to more sophisticated project management tools, and more experience managing teams — which makes these results surprising. Why are large enterprise companies not more confident about their SEO skills and experience?

Before going too far in making assumptions about their increased resources, we made sure to ask our survey-takers about this. Specifically, we asked for how much budget is allocated to SEO activity per month — not including the cost of employees’ salaries, or the overhead costs of keeping the lights on — since this would result in a figure easier to report consistently across all survey takers.

It turns out that 57% of large enterprise companies had over $ 10K dedicated strictly to SEO activity each month, in contrast to just 24% of small enterprise companies allocating this much budget. 40% of large enterprise had over $ 20K dedicated to SEO activity each month, suggesting that SEO is a huge priority for them. And yet, as we saw earlier, they are not sold on their team having reached leader status.

Enterprise SEO managers in large companies value being scalable and repeatable

We asked survey takers to rate the success of their current SEO strategy, per the scale mapped below, and here are the results:

Chart_Q8_170522.png

A smaller percentage of large enterprise SEOs had a clearly positive rating of the current success of their SEO strategy than did small enterprise SEOs. We even see more large enterprise SEOs “on the fence” about their strategy’s performance as opposed to small. This suggests that, from the enterprise SEOs we surveyed, the ones who work for smaller companies tend to be slightly more optimistic about their campaigns’ performance than the larger ones.

What’s notable about the responses to this question is that 18.33% of managers at large enterprise companies would rate themselves as successful — calling themselves “scalable and repeatable.” No one at a small enterprise selected this to describe their strategy. We clearly tapped into an important value for these teams, who use it enough to measure their performance that it’s a value they can report on to others as a benchmark of their success.

Anyone seeking to work with large enterprise clients needs to make sure their processes are scalable and repeatable. This also suggests that one way for a growing company to step up its SEO team’s game as it grows is by achieving these results. This would be a good topic for us to address in greater detail in articles, webinars, and other industry communication.

Agencies know best? (Agencies think they know best.)

Regardless of the resources available to them, across the board we see that in-house SEOs do not show as much confidence as agencies. Agencies are far more likely to rate their SEO strategy as successful: 43% of survey takers who worked for agencies rated their strategy as outright successful, as opposed to only 13% of in-house SEOs. That’s huge!

While nobody said their strategy was a total disaster — we clearly keep awesome company — 7% of in-house SEOs expressed frustration with their strategy, as opposed to only 1% of agencies.

Putting our bias as a link building agency aside, we would expect in-house SEO enterprise teams to work like in-house agencies. With the ability to hire top talent and purchase enterprise software solutions to automate and track campaigns, we expect them to have the appropriate tools and resources at their disposal to generate the same results and confidence as any agency.

So why the discrepancy? It’s hard to say for sure. One theory might be that those scalable, repeatable results we found earlier that serve as benchmarks for enterprise are difficult to attain, but the way agencies evolve might serve them better. Agencies tend to develop somewhat organically — expanding their processes over time and focusing on SEO from day one — as opposed to an in-house team in a company, which rarely was there from day one and, more often than not, sprouted up when the company’s growth made it such that marketing became a priority.

One clue for answering this question might come from examining the differences between how agencies and in-house SEO teams responded to the question asking them what they find to be the top two most difficult SEO obstacles they are currently facing.

Agencies have direction, need budget; in-house teams have budget, need direction

If we look at the top three obstacles faced by agencies and in-house teams, both of them place finding SEO talent up there. Both groups also say that demonstrating ROI is an issue, although it’s more of an obstacle for agencies rather than in-house SEO teams.

When we look at the third obstacles, we find the biggest reveal. While agencies find themselves hindered by trying to secure enough budget, in-house SEO teams struggle to develop the right content; this seems in line with the point we made in the previous section comparing agency versus in-house success. Agencies have the processes down, but need to work hard to fit their clients’ budgets. In-house teams have the budget they need, but have trouble lining them up to the exact processes their company needs to grow as desired. The fact that almost half of the in-house SEOs would rank developing the right content as their biggest obstacle — as opposed to just over a quarter of agencies — further supports this, particularly given how important content is to any marketing campaign.

Now, let’s take a step back and dig deeper into that second obstacle we noted: demonstrating ROI.

Everyone seems to be measuring success differently

One question that we asked of survey takers was about the top two technical SEO issues they monitor:

The spread across the different factors were roughly the same across the two different groups. The most notable difference between the two groups was that even more in-house SEO teams looked at page speed, although this was the top factor for both groups. Indexation was the second biggest factor for both groups, followed by duplicate content. There seems to be some general consensus about monitoring technical SEO issues.

But when we asked everyone what their top two factors are when reviewing their rankings, we got these results:

For both agencies and in-house SEO teams, national-level keywords were the top factor, although this was true for almost-three quarters of in-house SEOs and about half of agencies. Interestingly, agencies focused a bit more on geo/local keywords as well as mobile. From when we first opened this data we found this striking, because it suggests a narrative where in-house SEO teams focus on more conservative, “seasoned” methods, while agencies are more likely to stay on the cutting-edge.

Looking at the “Other” responses (free response), we had several write-ins from both subgroups who answered that traffic and leads were important to them. One agency survey-taker brought up a good point: that what they monitor “differs by client.” We would be remiss if we did not mention the importance of vertical-specific and client-specific approaches — even if you are working in-house, and your only client is your company. From this angle, it makes sense that everyone is measuring rankings and SEO differently.

However, we would like to see a bit more clarity within the community on setting these parameters, and we hope that these results will foster that sort of discussion. Please do feel free to reply in the comments:

  • How do you measure ROI on your SEO efforts?
  • How do you show your campaigns’ value?
  • What would you change about how you’re currently measuring the success of your efforts?

So what’s next?

We’d love to hear about your experiences, in-house or agency, and how you’ve been able to demonstrate ROI on your campaigns.

We’re going to repeat this survey again next year, so stay tuned. We hope to survey a larger audience so that we can break down the groups we examine further and analyze response trends among the resulting subgroups. We wanted to do this here in this round of analysis, but were hesitant because of how small the resulting sample size would be.

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50 Influential Women in Content Marketing 2017 #CMWorld

50 Influential Women Content Marketing

With over 200 speakers, moderators, panelists and workshop leaders at the 2017 Content Marketing World conference, it is a substantial task to investigate the influence of so many accomplished marketing professionals.

For this year’s list of influential content marketing speakers, I went a step further and took into account those who have presented at Content Marketing World over the past 3 years. That’s 392 speakers in all!

content marketing influencer network visualization traackr

We’ve been publishing lists like this for years and with the help of Traackr for assessing topical influence, relevance, resonance and reach, I think we have another great group of content marketing smarties for you to follow.

Please don’t confuse a list like this on one topical dimension and three sorting criteria as the same thing as developing an influencer list for a marketing program. That requires deeper topic distillation, customer insight, influencer audience analysis, content stage to influencer mapping and customization based on goals, channel, competition, resources and timeframe. You can tell I’m a consultant, can’t you?!

One big change for this particular content marketing influencer list is that I decided to focus on the top women in content marketing. Outside of the obvious, one of my main motivations for this emphasis is that there isn’t a marketing conference operating today that isn’t scrambling to find more women to speak. I hope this list helps organizers connect with some great talent.

Ranking criteria is based on “content marketing” using a mix of topical relevance, resonance / engagement on the topic with the audience and reach, or network size. According to Traackr….

The “Most Engaging Influencer” Award (for men and women combined) goes to:

Ann "Queen of Content" Handley
Ann Handley
@marketingprofs
Chief Content Officer
MarketingProfs

Here are the remaining 49 Influential Women in Content Marketing:

Carla Johnson @carlajohnson
Keynote Speaker, Author, Storyteller and Creative Explorer
Type A Communications

Erika Heald @sferika
Marketing Consultant
Erika Heald Consulting

Pam Didner @pamdidner
Senior Marketing Consultant, Author, Speaker
Relentless Pursuit

Rachel Parker @rachparker
Content Marketing Consultant
Resonance Content Marketing

Donna Moritz @sociallysorted
Digital Content Strategist, Social Media Trainer, Visual Storyteller, Visual Content Strategy
Socially Sorted

Gini Dietrich @ginidietrich
Chief Executive Officer
Arment Dietrich, Inc.

Cathy McPhillips @cmcphillips
Vice President of Marketing
Content Marketing Institute

Melanie Deziel @mdeziel
Brand Strategy Consultant and Speaker
Mdeziel Media

Mari Smith @marismith
Keynote Speaker, Author, Facebook Trainer, Social Media Evangelist
Mari Smith Social Media Speaker & Consultant

Heidi Cohen @heidicohen
Chief Content Officer
Actionable Marketing Guide

Deirdre Breakenridge @dbreakenridge
CEO
Pure Performance Communications

Peg Sieren Miller @pegmiller
Vice President Marketing
Tax Guard

Michele Linn @michelelinn
Vice President of Content
Content Marketing Institute

Andrea Fryrear @andreafryrear
Editor in Chief
The Agile Marketer

Jennifer Gregory @byjengregory
Freelance Content Marketing Writer and Strategist

Ardath Albee @ardath421
CEO & B2B Marketing Strategist
Marketing Interactions

Ashley Zeckman @azeckman
Director of Agency Marketing
TopRank® Marketing

Maureen Jann @maureenonpoint
Managing Director
SuperDeluxe Marketing

Berrak Sarikaya @berrakbiz
Founder
Amplify Your Biz LLC

Val Swisher @valswisher
Founder & CEO
Content Rules, Inc.

Pamela Muldoon @pamelamuldoon
Campaign and Content Strategist
The Pedowitz Group

Zontee Hou @zontee_hou
President and Founder
Media Volery LLC

Rebecca Lieb @lieblink
Advisory Board Member
Netswitch Technology Management, Inc.

Amy Higgins @amywhiggins
Account Manager
TopRank Marketing

Melissa Eggleston @melissa_egg
User Experience Researcher
Lenovo

Amanda Todorovich @amandatodo
Director, Content Marketing
Cleveland Clinic

Stephanie Losee @slosee
Head of Content
Visa

Jacquie Chakirelis @jacquiechak
Market Manager
Aviatra Accelerators

Carrie Hane @carriehd
Principal Strategist
Tanzen

Ahava Leibtag @ahaval
President
Aha Media Group

Colleen Jones @leenjones
CEO
Content Science

Sharon Toerek @sharontoerek
Principal
Toerek Law

Ruth P. Stevens @RuthPStevens
President
eMarketing Strategy

Katrina Neal @katrina_neal
Content Marketing Evangelist
LinkedIn

Deana Goldasich @goldasich
CEO
Well Planned Web, LLC

Kristina Halvorson @halvorson
Founder and CEO
Brain Traffic, Confab Events

Clare Mcdermott @soloportfolio
Editor
Chief Content Officer Magazine

Monina Wagner @moninaw
Social Media Community Manager
Content Marketing Institute, a UBM company

Susan Borst @susanborst
Deputy Director
Mobile IAB

Heather Hurst @hehurst
Director, Corporate Marketing
Workfront

Lisa Mattson @lisamattsonwine
Marketing Director
Jordan Vineyard & Winery

Amanda Changuris @amandachanguris
Associate Director of Corporate Communications
BNY Mellon

Amisha Gandhi @amishagandhi
Global Product Marketing, Cross-Mobile Portfolio and Thought Leadership
SAP

Tami Cannizzaro @tamicann
Vice President, Head of North America Marketing
CA Technologies

Heather Pemberton Levy @heathrpemberton
Vice President, Content Strategy Publishing
Gartner

Anna Hrach @annabananahrach
Strategist
Convince & Convert

Michelle Park Lazette @mp_lazette
Writer, Corporate Communications
Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland

Margaret Magnarelli @mmagnarelli
Managing Editor, Content and Senior Director, Marketing
Monster

Mariah Obiedzinski @mariahwrites
Director, Content Marketing
MedTouch

BIG congratulations to Joe Pulizzi, Pam Kozelka, Joe Kalinowski, Robert Rose, Cathy McPhillips, Michelle Linn, Andrea Larick and the entire CMI team on producing the most remarkable content marketing conference over the past 7 years!

As one of about a dozen or so people who have attended and presented at every single CMWorld conference since it started, I am proud to have been a part of such an impactful event and community. I’m also very proud of our partnership and collaboration over the years with CMI (Cathy and Joe K. especially) to help promote the Content Marketing World conference through the famous conference ebooks.

If you’re wondering what I mean by Content Marketing World conference ebooks, here’s a list:

2012 – 29 Secrets About Content Marketing

2013 – 36 Content Marketers Who Rock

2014 – Building a Content Marketing Strategy

2014 – Building an Audience Development Strategy for Content Marketing

2014 – A Visual Content Marketing Strategy

2014 – Showing Real ROI for Your Content Marketing

2015 – The Big Picture of Content Marketing Strategy

2015 – Making Content Marketing The Start of Your Marketing

2015 – Measuring Your Content Marketing Box Office Success

2017 – In-Flight Guide: Prepping for Your Content Marketing Expedition

2017 – In-Flight Guide: Creating a Memorable Content Experience

2017 – In-Flight Guide: Making the Most of your Content Journey

I will be speaking twice at this year’s Content Marketing World. My general session presentation on big brand influencer marketing is full, but I think there might still be a few spots open for the workshop. I hope to see you there!

Influencer Marketing Strategy A to Z
Sept 5: 1:000pm – 3:00pm

Workshop – Influencer Marketing Strategy A to Z

Can you qualify who the best influencers are for your brand? Is your approach to influencer engagement transactional or relationship focused? How do you know influencer marketing efforts are actually working?

Influencer Marketing strategies that focus on developing relationships with internal and industry experts with active networks to co-create content and drive measurable business goals are leading brands, big and small, to greater marketing success. An integrated and relationship-driven approach to influencer engagement taps a much greater resource internally and externally while contributing a quantity of quality content that can be used and repurposed.

To take A to Z advantage of all the opportunities influencer marketing brings requires a plan. This interactive workshop will engage attendees to learn:

  • Where influencer collaboration can have the most impact for your company and customers
  • A framework for integrating influencers in content marketing programs
  • How to align influencer marketing goals with measurement
  • Options for paid influencer marketplaces vs. DIY influencer marketing platforms
  • B2B influencer marketing strategy best practices
  • B2C influencer marketing strategy best practices

Big Brand Influencer Marketing
Sept 6: 11:20am – 12:05pm
Solo – Big Brand influencer Marketing: Trends & Best Practices

New research shows 80% of marketers rate content marketing as most impacted by influencer marketing, yet only 10% of marketing budgets are allocated to the practice. As large enterprises move from experimentation to sophistication when working with influencers, it is essential to understand the trends and best practices that will drive content marketing success on the road to 2020.

From activation to co-creation to technology recommendations, influencer marketing strategies, tactics and measurement best practices for large companies are unique and require specialized insight.

Through a combination of research, first hand experiences across numerous large enterprise influencer marketing programs and a select number of big brand case studies, attendees will learn:

  • 3 critical reasons why influencer engagement is not right for your company
  • 5 research based best practices driving influencer content success at large brands
  • 3 lessons learned from big brand influencer campaigns
  • 5 influencer marketing platforms, marketplaces and tools to help integrate and scale

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© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2017. | 50 Influential Women in Content Marketing 2017 #CMWorld | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post 50 Influential Women in Content Marketing 2017 #CMWorld appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®

Relive MozCon with the 2017 Video Bundle

Posted by Danielle_Launders

MozCon may be over, but we just can’t get enough of it — and that’s why our team has worked hard to bring the magic back to you with our MozCon 2017 Video Bundle. You’ll have 26 sessions at your fingertips to watch over and over again — that’s over 14 hours of future-focused sessions aiming to level up your SEO and online marketing skills. Get ahead of Google and its biggest changes to organic search with Dr. Pete Meyers, prepare for the future of mobile-first indexing with Cindy Krum, and increase leads through strategic data-driven design with Oli Gardner.

Ready to dive into all of the excitement? Feel free to jump ahead:

Buy the MozCon 2017 Video Bundle

For our friends that attended MozCon 2017, check your inbox: You should find an email from us that will navigate you to your videos. The same perk applies for next year — your ticket to MozCon 2018 includes the full video bundle. We do have a limited number of super early bird tickets (our best deal!) still available.

This year’s MozCon was truly special. We are honored to host some of the brightest minds in the industry and the passion and insights they bring to the stage. We know you’ll enjoy all the new tactics and innovative topics just as much as we did.

But don’t just take our word for it…

Here’s a recap of one attendee’s experience:

“Attending MozCon is like a master’s course in digital marketing. With so many knowledgeable speakers sharing their insights, their methods, and their tools all in the hopes of making me a better digital marketer, it seems like a waste not to take advantage of it.”
– Sean D. Francis, Director of SEO at Blue Magnet Interactive

The video bundle

You’ll have access to 26 full video presentations from MozCon.

For $ 299, the MozCon 2017 video bundle gives you instant access to:

  • 26 videos (that’s over 14 hours of content)
  • Stream or download the videos to your computer, tablet, or phone. The videos are iOS, Windows, and Android-compatible
  • Downloadable slide decks for presentations

Buy the MozCon 2017 Video Bundle

Want a free preview?

If you haven’t been to a MozCon before, you might be a little confused by all of the buzz and excitement. To convince you that we’re seriously excited, we’re sharing one of our highly-rated sessions with you for free! Check out “How to Get Big Links” with Lisa Myers in the full session straight from MozCon 2017. Lisa shares how her and her team were able to earn links and coverage from big sites such as New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and BBC.

I want to thank the team behind the videos and for all the hours of editing, designing, coding, processing, and more. We love being able to share this knowledge and couldn’t do it without the crew’s efforts. And to the community, we wish you happy learning and hope to see you at MozCon 2018 in July!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


Moz Blog

Proof that no ranking boost for responsive sites exists in 2017

There are many good reasons to recommend responsive design to a client or to your company, but achieving better search results isn’t among them, argues columnist Bryson Meunier. The post Proof that no ranking boost for responsive sites exists in 2017 appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.


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