Monitoring web migrations: A checklist for moving from one site to another

Contributor Aleyda Solis walks through what to monitor during a web migration and explains how to fix issues so you don’t lose traffic and rankings. The post Monitoring web migrations: A checklist for moving from one site to another appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.


Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Do You Really Need Another Blog Post? Why Content Marketing Needs More Flexibility

For at least a decade, the 500-word blog post has been the atomic unit of content marketing. Marketers like Joe Pulizzi and Marcus Sheridan built their entire careers on blogging. In Joe’s case, he started the blog without a business plan or a product, and developed both after building an audience through insightful, valuable blog posts. Even TopRank Marketing relied on blogging as a tactic for building thought leadership and establishing authority.

When new clients partner with our agency, they’re frequently looking to follow in Joe and Marcus’ footsteps. They want 15, 20, 30 short blog posts a month as the foundation of their content efforts.

That typically translates into requests for “X blog posts a month.” However, we’re more likely to think in terms of content units—the amount of effort the content team will put in, rather than the specific output.

Should you focus your time and resources on a blog? Are there better ways to serve your audience? Here’s how our agency is changing the way we think about content.

Why Short-Form Blog Posts Are No Longer the Atomic Unit of Content Marketing Strategy

Short Blog Posts Are Losing Search Visibility
One of the chief purposes of a blog is to capture search engine rankings. You write useful content, people find it via search, they subscribe and keep coming back for more. But short blog posts aren’t great at capturing rankings anymore. There’s just too much short-form content out there for even the most optimized post to rise above it.

Quality Beats Quantity
Longer-form content tends to dominate search rankings. Comprehensive, in-depth best answer content will not only rank higher for the main search term, it’s more likely to include (and rank for) long-term keywords as well.

Just ask Neil Patel, of Kissmetrics fame. He posts 1500+-word blog posts on the regular. You’ll find his posts on any list of highest-ranked or most-shared content on any topic he addresses. 

Most of us don’t have the time and resources to post best answer content every day, but that’s okay—a steady drip of high-quality content is still preferable to a deluge of shallower takes.

Blog Posts Are Temporary by Design
The very structure of a blog means that old posts are less likely to be read than the latest post – and the latest one quickly joins the seldom-seen archives. This kind of content is good for satisfying subscribers, but not great for long-term search visibility. The end goal of repurposing content is to take old blog posts and turn them into evergreen assets – so it makes sense to actually design evergreen assets as part of your strategy. 

The Way People Consume Content Is Changing
Last year, mobile internet use outstripped desktop use for the first time ever. In other words, all new internet traffic is happening on mobile devices. That’s significant for content creators, because 84.9% of smartphone time is spent in apps, versus on the mobile web.  While desktop users might have spent more time reading blogs and visiting websites, mobile traffic is concentrated in apps like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter. These apps require a different type of content to earn audience attention.

Blogs Are Still a Thing – But Not the Only Thing
That’s not to say that blogging is dead, of course. A blog can be a great place to interact with customers and prospects, build credibility, establish thought leadership, and round up subscribers. But focusing exclusively on creating a ton of blog content is no longer the best strategy.

More Flexible Content Alternatives

Instead of creating a set number of blog posts a month, focus on the outcomes you want to achieve. The deliverable should match your goals, not the other way around. You’ll end up with a more efficient use of your time and resources, and content assets that get the job done.

Long-Form Assets
For example, if your goal is to top the rankings for a specific keyword, roll three posts’ worth of effort into crafting a long-form resource. Then put that resource on your Features page, or give it its own slot on your navigation header – don’t bury it in the blog. The closer your page is to your site’s root directory, the more weight it carries for ranking purposes. That is, Google will give preference to “www.yourcompany.com/awesome-resource” than “www.yourcompany.com/blog/2017/October/awesome-resource.”

Video Content
Trading short-form blog posts for video content is another useful tactic. Video can be embedded in a blog post, but also find another life on Facebook and YouTube. Our client DivvyHQ recently published a video series with the videos hosted on YouTube. They can serve their blog audience, but also reach out to a new audience through the YouTube app. TopRank Marketing creates a weekly news video that we post to Facebook, and each video earns hundreds of views natively on the platform.

 Influencer Content
If your daily blog responsibilities have kept you from exploring influencer marketing, it’s high time to devote attention to it. Influencers can help boost your credibility, increase visibility, and create relationships that will serve your business in the long-term. A single influencer co-created asset can achieve far higher visibility than the most comprehensive blog post.

Blog On – But Blog Wisely

The humble blog post had a good run – it dominated content marketing strategy for the 00s and most of the 2010s. But the content landscape is changing, and we need to change with it. Don’t ditch your blog just yet, but do examine how you’re using the time and resources available to you.

Focus on your desired outcomes rather than a rigid set of deliverables. Give your content team the flexibility to explore new strategies, and you can evolve your content mix along with your audience’s demands.

 


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The post Do You Really Need Another Blog Post? Why Content Marketing Needs More Flexibility appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®

How to Diagnose Pages that Rank in One Geography But Not Another – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

Are you ranking pretty well in one locale, only to find out your rankings tank in another? It’s not uncommon, even for sites without an intent to capture local queries. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand shows you how to diagnose the issue with a few clever SEO tricks, then identify the right strategy to get back on top.

Diagnose Why Pages ranks for One Geography But Not Another

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to this edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re going to chat about rankings that differ from geography to geography. Many of you might see that you are ranking particularly well in one city, but when you perform that search in another city or in another country perhaps, that still speaks the same language and has very similar traits, that maybe you’re not performing well.

Maybe you do well in Canada, but you don’t do well in the United States. Maybe you do well in Portland, Oregon, but you do poorly in San Diego, California. Sometimes you might be thinking to yourself, “Well, wait, this search is not particularly local, or at least I didn’t think of it as being particularly local. Why am I ranking in one and not the other?” So here’s a process that you can use to diagnose.

Confirm the rankings you see are accurate:

The first thing we need to do is confirm that the rankings you see or that you’ve heard about are accurate. This is actually much more difficult than it used to be. It used to be you could scroll to the bottom of Google and change your location to whatever you wanted. Now Google will geolocate you by your IP address or by a precise location on your mobile device, and unfortunately you can’t just specify one particular location or another — unless you know some of these SEO hacks.

A. Google’s AdPreview Tool – Google has an ad preview tool, where you can specify and set a particular location. That’s at AdWords.Google.com slash a bunch of junk slash ad preview. We’ll make sure that the link is down in the notes below.

B. The ampersand-near-equals parameter (&near=) – Now, some SEOs have said that this is not perfect, and I agree it is imperfect, but it is pretty close. We’ve done some comparisons here at Moz. I’ve done them while I’m traveling. It’s not bad. Occasionally, you’ll see one or two things that are not the same. The advertisements are frequently not the same. In fact, they don’t seem to work well. But the organic results look pretty darn close. The maps results look pretty darn close. So I think it’s a reasonable tool that you can use.

That is by basically changing the Google search query — so this is the URL in the search query — from Google.com/search?q= and then you might have ice+cream or WordPress+web+design, and then you use this, &near= and the city and state here in the United States or city and province in Canada or city and region in another country. In this case, I’m going with Portland+OR. This will change my results. You can give this a try yourself. You can see that you will see the ice cream places that are in Portland, Oregon, when you perform this search query.

For countries, you can use another one. You can either go directly to the country code Google, so for the UK Google.co.uk, or for New Zealand Google.co.nz, or for Canada Google.ca. Then you can type that in.You can also use this parameter &GL= instead of &near. This is global location equals the country code, and then you could put in CA for Canada or UK for the UK or NZ for New Zealand.

C. The Mozbar’s search profiles – You can also do this with the MozBar. The MozBar kind of hacks the near parameter for you, and you can just specify a location and create a search profile. Do that right inside the MozBar. That’s one of the very nice things about using it.

D. Rank tracking with a platform that supports location-specific rankings Some of them don’t, some of them do. Moz does right now. I believe Searchmetrics does if you use the enterprise. Oh, I’m trying to remember if Rob Bucci said STAT does. Well, Rob will answer in the comments, and he’ll tell us whether STAT does. I think that they do.

Look at who IS ranking and what features they may have:

So next, once you’ve figured out whether this ranking anomaly that you perceive is real or not, you can step two look at who is ranking in the one where you’re not and figure out what factors they might have going for them.

  • Have they gotten a lot of local links, location-specific links from these websites that are in that specific geography or serve that geography, local chambers of commerce, local directories, those kinds of things?
  • Do they have a more hyper-local service area? On a map, if this is the city, do they serve that specific region? You serve a broad set of locations all over the place, and maybe you don’t have a geo-specific region that you’re serving.
  • Do they have localized listings, listings in places like where Moz Local or a competitor like Yext or Whitespark might push all their data to? Those could be things like Google Maps and Bing Maps, directories, local data aggregators, Yelp, TripAdvisor, etc., etc.
  • Do they have rankings in Google Maps? If you go and look and you see that this website is ranking particularly well in Google Maps for that particular region and you are not, that might be another signal that hyper-local intent and hyper-local ranking signals, ranking algorithm is in play there.
  • Are they running local AdWords ads? I know this might seem like, “Wait a minute. Rand, I thought ads were not directly connected to organic search results.” They’re not, but it tends to be the case that if you bid on AdWords, you tend to increase your organic click-through rate as well, because people see your ad up at the top, and then they see you again a second time, and so they’re a little more biased to click. Therefore, buying local ads can sometimes increase organic click-through rate as well. It can also brand people with your particular business. So that is one thing that might make a difference here.

Consider location-based searcher behaviors:

Now we’re not considering who is ranking, but we’re considering who is doing the searching, these location-based searchers and what their behavior is like.

  • Are they less likely to search for your brand because you’re not as well known in that region?
  • Are they less likely to click your site in the SERPs because you’re not as well known?
  • Is their intent somehow different because of their geography? Maybe there’s a language issue or a regionalism of some kind. This could be a local language thing even here in the United States, where parts of the country say “soda” and parts of the country say “pop.” Maybe those mean two different things, and “pop” means, “Oh, it’s a popcorn store in Seattle,” because there’s the Pop brand, but in the Midwest, “pop” clearly refers to types of soda beverages.
  • Are they more or less sensitive to a co-located solution? So it could be that in many geographies, a lot of your market doesn’t care about whether the solution that they’re getting is from their local region, and in others it does. A classic one on a country level is France, whose searchers tend to care tremendously more that they are getting .fr results and that the location of the business they are clicking on is in France versus other folks in Europe who might click a .com or a .co.uk with no problem.

Divide into three buckets:

You’re going to divide the search queries that you care about that have these challenges into three different types of buckets:

Bucket one: Hyper-geo-sensitive

This would be sort of the classic geo-specific search, where you see maps results right up at the top. The SERPs change completely from geo to geo. So if you perform the search in Portland and then you perform it in San Diego, you see very, very different results. Seven to nine of the top ten at least are changing up, and it’s the case that almost no non-local listings are showing in the top five results. When you see these, this is probably non-targetable without a physical location in that geography. So if you don’t have a physical location, you’re kind of out of business until you get there. If you do, then you can work on the local ranking signals that might be holding you back.

Bucket two: Semi-geo-sensitive

I’ve actually illustrated this one over here, because this can be a little bit challenging to describe. But basically, you’re getting a mix of geo-specific and global results. So, for example, I use the &near=Portland, Oregon, because I’m in Seattle and I want to see Portland’s results for WordPress web design.

WordPress web design, when I do the search all over the United States, the first one or two results are pretty much always the same. They’re always this Web Savvy Marketing link and this Creative Bloq, and they’re very broad. They are not specifically about a local provider of WordPress web design.

But then you get to number three and four and five, and the results change to be local-specific businesses. So in Portland, it’s these Mozak Design guys. Mozak, no relation to Moz, to my knowledge anyway. In San Diego, it’s Kristin Falkner, who’s ranking number three, and then other local San Diego WordPress web design businesses at four and five. So it’s kind of this mix of geo and non-geo. You can generally tell this by looking and changing your geography in this fashion seeing those different things.

Some of the top search results usually will be like this, and they’ll stay consistent from geography to geography. In these cases, what you want to do is work on boosting those local-specific signals. So if you are ranking number five or six and you want to be number three, go for that, or you can try and be in the global results, in which case you’re trying to boost the classic ranking signals, not the local ones so you can get up there.

Bucket three: Non-geo-sensitive

Those would be, “I do this search, and I don’t see any local-specific results.” It’s just a bunch of nationwide or worldwide brands. There are no maps, usually only one, maybe two geo-specific results in the top 10, and they tend to be further down, and the SERPs barely change from geo to geo. They’re pretty much the same throughout the country.

So once you put these into these three buckets, then you know which thing to do. Here, it’s pursue classic signals. You probably don’t need much of a local boost.

Here, you have the option of going one way or the other, boosting local signals to get into these rankings or boosting the classic signals to get into those global ones.

Here you’re going to need the physical business.

All right, everyone. I hope you’ve enjoyed this edition of Whiteboard Friday, and we’ll see you again next week. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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Moz Blog

Your News Feed is such a mess that Facebook is giving you another one

TwitterFacebook

There’s nothing quite like a clean slate — especially one that’s pre-populated with a generous helping of algorithmically generated spam.

Perhaps realizing that the News Feed has over the years morphed into a cluttered mess, Facebook has started testing an entirely new feed with a subset of its users. 

After all, why have one feed when you can have two? Double the ad-serving pleasure, double the ad-revenue fun.

SEE ALSO: Facebook wants you to ‘explore’ a new News Feed

This new feed, identified by a rocket-ship logo, isn’t the same as your current stream of family-focused updates. Instead of pushing out every nut-bag conspiracy theory your former high school gym coach sees fit to share, it appears to exclusively focus on popular content tailored to your particular interests.  Read more…

More about Mark Zuckerberg, Social Media, Mobile, Snapchat, and Twitter


Social Media

Pinterest finds another way to track purchases via its new “Tried It” button

try_diy Pinterest has historically been more an idea board – a place to dream about ideas you want to try or products you want to buy. Today, however, the company is rolling out a new feature aimed at encouraging people to track and share the things they’ve actually done, too. With a new “tried it” checkmark on Pins, Pinterest users can share the ideas they’ve tried… Read More
Social – TechCrunch

Twitter cuts ties with another social media surveillance company

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Twitter continues to sever its ties with social media monitoring companies that provide information to law enforcement. 

The company confirmed to Mashable on Thursday that it recently ended its relationship with Snaptrends.

SEE ALSO: Geofeedia isn’t the only social media surveillance company giving data to police

The confirmation comes one week after Twitter publicly confirmed it had cut off another surveillance company’s access to data it was marketing to law enforcement.

Based on information in the @ACLU’s report, we are immediately suspending @Geofeedia’s commercial access to Twitter data.

— Policy (@policy) October 11, 2016 Read more…

More about Law Enforcement, Police, Aclu, Instagram, and Facebook


Social Media

When Is the Right Time to Start Another Podcast?

sr-start-another-podcast

In the past, we’ve laid out how to decide what topic to podcast about and how to decide what your podcast should be about, and we stand behind both pieces of advice.

Today, we are talking to the Showrunners who are running a podcast and are thinking about starting a second one — or maybe even a third or fourth.

Jerod and Jonny are both thinking about starting new shows and this conversation goes deep and personal on many levels:

  • A point of caution from Jerod before beginning
  • When can you be a producer, but not the host?
  • The three instances when it would make sense to start another show
  • Jerod’s excellent advice to Jonny about his new show idea

Listen to this Episode Now

The post When Is the Right Time to Start Another Podcast? appeared first on Copyblogger.


Copyblogger

3 Reasons to Never Take Another Job

Let’s face it. Jobs suck.

I spent 13 years of my life working in various jobs, and I never felt right about it. Not once did I feel like I was doing my life’s work.

that life is for someone else

There was always a little voice in the back of my head telling me “you’ll never be happy working for someone else. When are you going to get the balls to try working for yourself?

In 2006 I found those balls.

After 13 years of working on shit I didn’t care about, after the boredom, the depression, after all the crap I endured from bosses who expected 60 hour weeks and still gave me a hard time about taking a week off here or there, after feeling like there MUST be more to life than Corporate America™

I decided to ditch my well-paying but mind-numbingly-boring job and find out for myself if being self-employed was the answer to all my prayers.

I always knew my life would be incomplete until I at least tried working for myself. To see if I could do it and find out what life would be like without the rules everyone else lives under. For some reason, it took me 13 years and 5 jobs to finally take the plunge.

Finally I looked myself in the eye and asked, “why the fuck should I spend close to 50% of my waking hours during the most healthy and vibrant period of my life at a job, doing something I couldn’t care less about, contributing far less than my true potential to the world?

I decided I wanted my life to be about more than powerpoint slides and meetings, and worrying about what some boss thought of me.

Why the hell did it take me so long to ask this question and own up to what I felt was my destiny?

Mostly it was fear. Fear and comfort…

Why You Should Never Work a Job Again

Listen, if you like your job, that’s cool. I know there are some people out there who are fulfilled by their jobs. (although I suspect you might not be totally satisfied if you’re still reading this)

Most people I know pretty much hate their jobs. They complain about the work, the people, the commute, the pay, the hours, the lack of vacation time and control over their lives.

They talk about dreams and hobbies and “some day” as if it just isn’t in the cards for them. That version of life is for someone else, someone with better luck and fewer responsibilities.

99% of these people will work a job until they retire or die. Most just accept that having a job is something you simply do in life. You’re born, you grow up, you work at a job, you retire and enjoy yourself for a few years or a decade, you get old, and then you die.

Some of the poor and middle class complain about corporate control of wealth and power, and yet most of us work for those companies, buy what they sell us, watch what they create and accept their vision of the world as our reality.

But don’t get me started on that…

This isn’t about society or what other people do.

It’s about you.

its not about blank, its about youIt’s about asking yourself what you want your life to be all about. Do you want the next 30 years to go by, only to feel like you never tested yourself? Like you never stretched your limits and capabilities and experienced everything you possibly could in life? Like you wasted your potential because you lived under some invisible set of rules your whole life?

I’m not saying you should quit your job tomorrow (although you would probably be just fine if you did), but if you have the entrepreneurial bug like I did, you’ll never be completely satisfied until you try working for yourself.

If you feel like your job is keeping you from living the life you really want to live, here are three reasons you should never take a job again.

  1. Working a job gives someone else control over the majority of your life.
  2. These aren’t feudal times. If you live in the free world, there is no reason you have to work for someone else. The freedom to pursue happiness and live the life you desire is the greatest gift of modern society, yet most of us piss that opportunity away.

    When you work a job, someone else is ultimately in control of what you work on, what you’re responsible for, when you work, when you take time off and how much you earn.

    If you absolutely love your job, perhaps giving up that amount of control is worth it. For most people, it seems insane to accept those conditions.

  3. Working a job is dangerously comfortable.
  4. When you work for someone else, life is just comfortable enough to keep you from asking the really important questions.

    Sure, you feel like your soul is being crushed every day at work, but at least you get a paycheck, right?

    How much of that paycheck is spent on vices and entertainment just to make yourself feel better or to cover up the fundamental lack of fulfillment you feel?

    Fear is what keeps most people from doing extraordinary things in life. Most people choose to stay in jobs they hate because they’re scared shitless of the alternative. They’re afraid they don’t have what it takes, that they’ll fail miserably and become homeless embarrassments.

    The truth is, if you get past the fear and laziness, there’s no reason you can’t accomplish anything you want.

    Jobs keep you just comfortable enough so you never have a strong enough reason to confront those fears and start living your life’s purpose.

  5. Working for yourself is one of the most challenging and rewarding things you will ever do.
  6. As a kid growing up in the Pacific Northwest, I spent a fair amount of time fishing with my dad. I used to see this phrase on t-shirts and bumper stickers a lot:

    “The Worst Day Fishin’ is Better than the Best Day at Work.”

    The same is true of working for yourself.

    During the worst days of working for yourself, you’ll be terrified, worried, anxious and full of self-doubt. You’ll think you made a huge mistake and you’ll convince yourself that you don’t have what it takes.

    But even that day will be better than the best day of working for someone else. Maybe not on the surface, but deep-down there is still a sense of purpose and satisfaction that can only come from pursuing self-reliance in it’s highest form. Lions in the wild seem about ten times more alive than lions in the zoo.

There’s no better time than right now to start working for yourself.

How do I know this?

You’ll never be younger, and you’ll never be fully prepared.

never fully prepared

The perfect day to commit to your dream will never come. There is no such thing as being fully prepared. There are things you can never learn or prepare for except by actually doing them.

Working for yourself takes a tremendous amount of courage and energy. Every day you let go by makes it less likely you’ll ever pull the trigger, and less likely you’ll persevere if you do decide to quit.

For those of you already committing to working for yourself: It’s more possible than ever to make “your thing” and earn a full time living from it, but you HAVE to start with the right mindset and process.

This means changing everything you know about business… because the wrong expectations will sink any small business idea.

So, you need something that will train you without boring you to death, something that will walk you through each step of the process without limiting you, and something you can easily afford. It didn’t exist, so we made it.

If you’re already committed to working for yourself, watch this video and learn about the 9 stage business roadmap.

Maybe you need to do some more thinking. If so, keep reading. But if you already know you’re going to step out on your own, give yourself and your business the best possible chance of success and start your roadmap today.

(P.S. in the video you’ll learn about the 3 phases of the roadmap. This idea alone can help you process and plan better.)

If you’re feeling brave enough, here’s a challenge to consider:

Make your current job the last one you ever take.

Commit to making self-employment the only alternative to the job you have right now. Don’t give yourself the option of finding another job. Ever.

If you get sick of your job and want to find another, use that drive to go freelance or build your own business. Don’t give in and take another job.

If you get laid off or fired, use that as a sign that it’s time. Take your unemployment benefits or savings and buy your freedom by jumping into self employment.

But don’t wait around until you have no job, or until you get so sick of your current job that you have no other option. Instead, commit to yourself that you’ll quit your current job by a certain date. After that date, you’ll never work a regular job again. You’ll do whatever it takes to support yourself through your own creativity and perseverance.

If you’re reading this and you don’t have a job right now, fuck looking for one. How long will you spend looking for a job that you’re going to hate in six months anyway? Use that time instead to build a life of freedom and fulfillment. Live on your parents’ couch or live off your spouse’s earnings for as long as it takes. Convince your supporters that this is the greatest gift they could ever give you, and then don’t let them down.

Don’t accept this challenge lightly.

Take a weekend by yourself to really think about this challenge. Go away for a couple of days and ask yourself life’s hard questions. Ask what you really want your life to be about. What do you want to try, to experience, to accomplish?

If you decide that working for yourself should be a big part of your future, give yourself some time to put a plan together. Then, don’t be shy about telling people your plan. Once you set a date, the world will conspire to help you make your dream happen.

And remember, the worst that can happen probably isn’t all that bad.

The journey won’t be easy, but at least you’ll be growing and pushing yourself. You’ll be testing your limits. That’s one of life’s greatest gifts.

The irony is that by at least trying self employment, you’ll learn so much and gain so many new skills that you’ll end up becoming much more employable anyway.

Whatever you decide, be honest with yourself. You don’t have to accept your current reality as how you’re “supposed” to live, or as what you really want.

Start having this conversation with yourself today, because it’s one of the most important things you can do.

You owe it to yourself to live the life you know deep down you were meant to fulfill. You know it’s there. Making it happen all starts with admitting to yourself what you want.

fizzle small business roadmap

fizzle motivation and training


Fizzle

The rise of Pepe the Frog is another sign of hate festering online

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The ubiquitous green internet amphibian known as Pepe the Frog has been added to the Anti-Defamation League’s database of hate symbols. It’s yet another sign that neo-Nazi and white nationalist propaganda is proliferating online. 

The Anti-Defamation League’s hate symbols database is crowded with acronyms and photos of tattooed hate symbols, but the group has recently decided to look to the internet to more accurately track the spread of hate messages. 

SEE ALSO: White nationalist Twitter has exploded since 2014

“Our hate symbol database has sort of traditionally dealt with hate symbols that people might come in contact with in the street or on the ground,” Oren Segal, director of Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism, told Mashable. “We realize this year that more people are likely to come across hate symbols every day on their phones or online than necessarily in their neighborhood.” Read more…

More about Anti Semitic, Splc, 8chan, 4chan, and Reddit


Social Media

The NHL is hosting another #NHLMovieNight and hoping for another ‘Miracle’

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A Miracle is coming to Twitter.

Thanks to the National Hockey League, Twitter will become an arena for conversation around the 2004 movie Miracle on August 31 starting at 7 p.m. ET. 

The affair is the NHL’s second edition of #NHLMovieNight, a social media initiative where the league invites anyone to watch a film and tweet along. The NHL will have several employees monitoring Twitter for posts from fans and leagues and live-tweeting movie highlights from the @NHL account. 

In August of last year, the NHL hosted a watch party for D2: The Mighty Ducks and encouraged fans to tweet with the hashtag #NHLMovieNight. The league had 16 teams and thousands of fans participate. In an unexpected turn, one of the film’s actors, Joshua Jackson, jumped into the conversation on Twitter: Read more…

More about Business, Social Media, Olympics, Miracle, and Movie


Social Media